Browsing the archives for the african-american history tag

Wye House Plantation Environment: Culture and Perspective

I tried my best to appreciate everything that the Wye House Plantation has to offer in the short amount of time I was given to do so. The perspective that I created moving through this space was fluid. The first impression was the beauty of the open spaces, trees and river. The second impression after […]


“Knowledge Quite Worth Possessing”

One of our best glimpses into enslaved life at Wye House and at similar plantations across Maryland and the south comes from Frederick Douglass, the abolitionist who was enslaved at Wye House for several years. In each of his autobiographies, he opens with a description of slave life on the plantation.  Our use of Douglass […]

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Using Historical Documents to Find Individuals from the Past

A question recently arose concerning the 1858 Dilworth map and what kind of information it can tell us. An individual commented on our last post, inquiring about what kinds of people are labeled on the map and what types of landmarks it shows. This is quite an interesting question, so this post is dedicated to […]

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Race, Landscapes, and Ideologies

Our six weeks of digging will end tomorrow. Writing this is bittersweet. I’m sure everyone can agree that while we’ll miss our unit partners and field directors, we might not miss the odd t-shirt tans we all have. Actually, a few of us just might miss those too. This has been a learning experience in […]


Week 3 in Annapolis

It is week 3 in downtown Historic Annapolis, and we have until Thursday to dig in our sites and then it is of to Wye House for the last 3 weeks of digging. Although many of the units are coming to sterile clay levels while their units come to a close, my unit (28) is […]


The Basement: “Small Find Heaven”

It is week two at the Archaeology in Annapolis field school and we are continuing to find a plethora of historic artifacts in our spider haven. My unit is in the low-ceilinged basement of the James Holliday house, a rewarding, though somewhat eerie, treasure chest of archaeological finds. The mummified spiders and “not-at-all-dangerous” asbestos pad […]