Browsing the archives for the annapolis tag

Filipinos in Annapolis: Recognizing A Forgotten Past

Last summer, I found myself starting a new journey with Archaeology in Annapolis in exploring the forgotten history of Filipino immigrants in the city. From 1898 to 1946, Philippines was an American territory, allowing a mass exodus of laborers into the country as nationalists. In 1901, the U.S. began recruiting Filipinos into the Navy. Annapolis […]

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Reynolds Tavern: Adventures in Site Report Writing

In 1984, excavations ceased at the historic Reynolds Tavern in Annapolis.  Four years later, I was born. You could say I solidly missed the opportunity to excavate this site, one of the first of many projects to be undertaken by Archaeology in Annapolis.  Reynolds Tavern, built by William Reynolds on Annapolis’ historic Church Circle, has […]

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Challenging Landscapes

The Archaeology in Annapolis crew is back from another Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) conference, this year held in Leicester, England. Ben Skolnik and I co-authored a paper, combining our research interests and efforts. You can listen to Ben deliver the paper and see the visual aids from our presentation in the video below. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLZEKIX9CGA […]

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Photography and Archaeology

In addition to trowels and shovels and ¼ inch steel mesh screens, one of the most important pieces of equipment we carry with us into the field is a camera.  Not only do we use our camera to record and document the levels and features we excavate, we can use it as a tool for […]

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Urban Annapolis and Rural Wye House

As we ended our excavations in Annapolis and moved to the very different setting at Wye House, it has been interesting to reflect on the differences between the two units on which I have worked – particularly on their stratigraphy and the artifacts they produced – and what those differences say about the sites. The […]

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Farewell Annapolis

This week was definitely one of the most arduous, yet entertaining weeks so far. Early in the week, our team from unit 26 unearthed an articulated animal skeleton. We have yet to determine the exact species, but we believe it to be a young lamb or goat. Initially, it was thought to be a calf […]

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Unit 26

As we close up our units on Cornhill Street, it is cool to reflect on what we have accomplished in the past three weeks.  My unit, number 26, faced the initial challenge of removing six inches of gravel from the backyard we were digging in.  It took us the entire first day to clear the […]

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Week 3 in Annapolis

It is week 3 in downtown Historic Annapolis, and we have until Thursday to dig in our sites and then it is of to Wye House for the last 3 weeks of digging. Although many of the units are coming to sterile clay levels while their units come to a close, my unit (28) is […]

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Working with Historic Maps

One of the most important strengths of historical archaeology is our ability and willingness to combine anthropology, dirt, and the historical record.  Using documents to aid archaeological research is one of the defining characteristics of the discipline.  These come in many forms–including, but certainly not limited to, deeds, journals, diaries, letters, probate inventories, wills, church […]

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Understanding What’s Underground

After spending almost two weeks excavating in the James Holliday house, digging up countless household items, it’s easy to see that although generations span between us, modern day Marylanders are similar to their Annapolis ancestors.    As we slowly sift through the shards that once made up a family’s life, it becomes apparent what kind of […]

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