Browsing the archives for the background tag

Wye House Plantation and Landscape Archaeology

This week, our field school has begun digging at Wye House Plantation in Easton, MD, where we will be working for the next three weeks. This is not the first year the AiA program has excavated at Wye House – for the past few summers, archaeology students have been digging units at various locations of […]

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Reynolds Tavern: Adventures in Site Report Writing

In 1984, excavations ceased at the historic Reynolds Tavern in Annapolis.  Four years later, I was born. You could say I solidly missed the opportunity to excavate this site, one of the first of many projects to be undertaken by Archaeology in Annapolis.  Reynolds Tavern, built by William Reynolds on Annapolis’ historic Church Circle, has […]

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Working with Historic Maps

One of the most important strengths of historical archaeology is our ability and willingness to combine anthropology, dirt, and the historical record.  Using documents to aid archaeological research is one of the defining characteristics of the discipline.  These come in many forms–including, but certainly not limited to, deeds, journals, diaries, letters, probate inventories, wills, church […]

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Wye House: Seven Years of Archaeology

Following these two weeks of blogging by our field school students and staff and before completing our final week of excavations, it is appropriate to refresh everyone of our work at Wye House. Here is a condensed version of our time at Wye House. In 2004, Mrs. R. Carmichael Tilghman offered our project the opportunity […]

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Why are we digging where we are at Wye?

One of the questions I answered a few weeks ago was “How do you know where to dig?” That was my short answer. Since then, many people have specifically asked us, “How did you know where to find these quarters that you’re excavating this summer?” This is my long answer. Before we can know where […]

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Annapolis in the Early 1900s: Filipino Immigrants

This post is written by future Archaeology in Annapolis graduate student Kathrina Aben: The week spent helping excavate the James Holliday house has been a wonderful opportunity to learn about early 20th century life in Annapolis. At the time, two minority groups lived in the city: African-Americans and Filipino immigrants. They each had their own […]

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The Pinkney House: A Little Context

To contextualize our work at the Pinkney House, here is a brief history of the site. This is our first field season working at the site, although this work is an extension of our earlier work on neighboring Fleet, Cornhill, and East Streets. During the last decades of the 19th century, and the first quarter […]

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The James Holliday House and Family

To put our last post into context, I’ve put together a brief history of the James Holliday, his family and their property in Annapolis. The property on which the James Holliday sits was originally part of the land surveyed and designated for Governor Francis Nicholson in 1696. Between 1700 and 1850, the property changed hands […]

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