Browsing the archives for the gardening tag

The Beautiful, the Sublime and the Picturesque

On Monday, our first day at Wye House, we were given a tour of the property. I particularly enjoyed Beth’s discussion of the picturesque, the sublime and the beautiful.  In the 18th and 19th centuries, there was a movement to reconnect with nature.  For a long time people had been scared of nature and believed […]

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Wye House Plantation and Landscape Archaeology

This week, our field school has begun digging at Wye House Plantation in Easton, MD, where we will be working for the next three weeks. This is not the first year the AiA program has excavated at Wye House – for the past few summers, archaeology students have been digging units at various locations of […]

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The Sun is the Same, in a Relative Way

How well the skillful gard’ner drew Of flowers and herbs this dial new; Where from above the milder sun Does through a fragrant zodiac run; And, as it works, th’ industrious bee Computes its time as well as we. How could such sweet and wholesome hours Be reckoned but with herbs and flowers! – Andrew […]

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A Hothouse Found

The greenhouse at the Wye House Plantation is known for being the only standing greenhouse from the 18th century in North America. When Archaeology in Annapolis began its excavations at Wye, particular attention was paid to this structure, at the request of the owners. My dissertation research has been focused on the greenhouse and gardens, […]

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“Here was a field for industry and enterprise, strongly inviting”

The following was presented at the Society for Historical Archaeology 2012 conference in Baltimore, as part of the symposium People Who Lived With Glass Houses: The Archaeology of Gardens and Scientific Agriculture in Early America. “Here was a field for industry and enterprise, strongly inviting:” using GIS to identify scientific gardening and agriculture on plantation […]

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Week 4 Round-Up

The field school moved out to the Wye House plantation this week, delving into the history of the slave laborers. Using historic maps and aerial photography of the landscape, graduate student Benjamin Skolnik identified what we believe to be two slave quarters, and we have spent this first week attempting to find the foundations of […]

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Tour of the Paca Garden and Carroll Estate

Recently, I had the opportunity to visit the William Paca Garden and the Charles Carroll of Carrolton House and Garden, both located in Historic Annapolis, Maryland. William Paca and Charles Carroll were two of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence and were important men of their day. They lived on grand estates and […]

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