Browsing the archives for the GIS tag

GIS Day and Archaeology in Annapolis

Here in our laboratory, several of us use GIS in our work.  In honor of GIS Day, here’s an introduction to some of the things we do.  Benjamin Skolnik In my work on historic plantation landscapes, GIS has been instrumental to mapping and visualizing the past.  Digitizing and georeferencing historic maps and orthorectifying historic photographs […]

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Using Historical Documents to Find Individuals from the Past

A question recently arose concerning the 1858 Dilworth map and what kind of information it can tell us. An individual commented on our last post, inquiring about what kinds of people are labeled on the map and what types of landmarks it shows. This is quite an interesting question, so this post is dedicated to […]

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Emerging Scholars Research Project

Though field school is over, archaeological discovery continues. I previously worked on the James Holliday house in Annapolis, the Wye House Plantation, and the Buffalo Soldier’s house in Easton. On those sites, we dug, sweated, found great artifacts, and pieced together forgotten stories from the past. Now, in the air-conditioned lab, our goal is slightly […]

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Working with Historic Maps

One of the most important strengths of historical archaeology is our ability and willingness to combine anthropology, dirt, and the historical record.  Using documents to aid archaeological research is one of the defining characteristics of the discipline.  These come in many forms–including, but certainly not limited to, deeds, journals, diaries, letters, probate inventories, wills, church […]

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“Here was a field for industry and enterprise, strongly inviting”

The following was presented at the Society for Historical Archaeology 2012 conference in Baltimore, as part of the symposium People Who Lived With Glass Houses: The Archaeology of Gardens and Scientific Agriculture in Early America. “Here was a field for industry and enterprise, strongly inviting:” using GIS to identify scientific gardening and agriculture on plantation […]

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Why are we digging where we are at Wye?

One of the questions I answered a few weeks ago was “How do you know where to dig?” That was my short answer. Since then, many people have specifically asked us, “How did you know where to find these quarters that you’re excavating this summer?” This is my long answer. Before we can know where […]

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