MAPPimages

Wow WebsiteArchive

Mar 09

Looking for Images? Do you need to make a presentation, or write a paper?

Did you know that you can find images in Artstor, save them in a group, export them straight to a ready-made Powerpoint, and also save citations if you need to use the image in a paper? That’s a handy dandy footnote already made for you.
Also, Artstor has great help documents and, Bonus: The University of Maryland Libraries subscribe to Artstor so you can set up an account with your umd.edu email address and have access to all these features.

Lets Get Started:
Go to Lib.umd.edu and select databases.

Library’s Databases webpage.

Type in Artstor in the search box. Click on Artstor.

You can register with your University email address and then search for images.

If you need a tutorial to help you get started contact Cindy in the VRC – cfrank@umd.edu. We can set up an appointment!

And remember that Artstor has help documents Here.

Mar 06

Are you looking for images?

Screen Shot 2014-03-06 at 5.51.52 PMThe Getty archive consists of 35 million images, and now you can access them for free – within limits. This means non-commercial use only, and you have to use the imbed link tool associated with the picture. The link directs a viewer back to the Getty Archive if they want to publish the image. Images can be used in blogs, and on websites. This article explains a little bit more about it.  http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2454616,00.asp

How about this one?

This is an interior of The Museum of Modern Art taken on March 5.

Searching the archive is a little bit tedious if you are looking for specifically named buildings, but if you are looking for concepts – like the Suburbs, or traffic patterns, you will have more success.

Jan 28

We like something because it makes sense. We get it.
I was just in a senior architecture studio pin-up, where the class was looking at each class member’s analytical drawings of a croissant. Each student had been asked to convey the ‘croissantness’ of a croissant; his or her choice on type of drawings, models or video. There were photographs of mixers, plans, sections, and elevations of the croissants, and sequential drawings of rolled up triangles. The student had to stand next to his or her set of drawings while the classmates interpreted the drawings. The exciting moment arrived when one person said’ “I like the drawings on the left. Why? Because they make sense.”
As designers, we like to make sense out of things, solve problems, provide solutions. I had a studio critic who explained it slightly differently – “Architects provide order out of disorder.” As architects we use graphics – our drawings and models – as the language of communication. What Makes Sense?
The VRC blog will revisit the issues of communication throughout the semester so welcome back!

In the meantime check out this website:

http://flowingdata.com/2012/04/27/data-and-visualization-blogs-worth-following/

Apr 05

The School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation grants graduate degrees in Historic Preservation, Architecture and Real Estate Development, as well as a Ph.D. program in Urban and Regional Planning and Design. At the undergraduate level you can get a Bachelor of Science Degree in Architecture.  But, what do you do with one of these? You could pursue the Architectural License, but you could also go into industrial design, or be an urban planner, or civil engineer.  For encouragement and consideration of the various options now open to you, please read Dr. Lee Waldreps’ brief and informative article titled, “Architecture and Beyond: Opportunities Abound”.

 

Remember, you are always learning people skills, communication and collaboration skills, and these will serve you well for any job.

Mar 30

Green_Building_Websites

This list of websites deals with Sustainability Issues!  Click on the link to download the PDF. Some have a homeowner’s focus, while others talk about real estate values and real estate law with respect to green technologies in a building.  Still others may approach the topic from a City point of view.

The University of Maryland's WaterShed, the Solar Decathlon winner, promotes a sustainable lifestyle, including a garden.

Mar 23

From time to time, I will post about websites that deal with Sustainability in its many permutations: architecture, real estate, city planning, historic preservation, and energy. The following list will start us off with connections to a broad selection of technologies, building design, and event tax credits.

http://inhabitat.com/

Website covers topics on emerging technologies, green building, energy efficient interior design, emerging sources of renewable energy and sustainable product design

http://energy.gov/

Links to public services initiatives, science and innovation, news, blogs, maps and data concerning the following topics: tax credits, heating and cooling, solar energy, home weatherization, appliances and electronics.

http://www.eere.energy.gov/

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Examples of energy efficient homes, buildings, cars and diagrams of solar energy, wind energy, water conservation and various fuels.

Mar 23

The Creative Commons portion of the image website Flickr is a terrific place to find images, and also participate in the sharing of these images. This first page shows you the various types of licenses and attributions under which photographers allow their images to be used.

If you are looking for images to illustrate a paper or blog, go to Flickr.com and click on the word ‘search’ in the upper right hand corner of the webpage. This takes you to a new search page.  You will see a drop-down list on the left side of the search field. Click on that and, from the menu, choose The Commons, then type in a key word for flickr to search on.

This picture came from the commons portion of Flickr.

You can download the picture to your desktop, but please pay attention to the licensing and copyright tags on the picture page.

Mar 13

ArchNet is a member-driven website that contains a digital library of images that deal with architecture and urban planning in a very easily searchable database. There are often plans, sections and elevations to accompany the general views of the buildings. It also allows participation and collaboration amongst members, and is free to join.

I have found that there is strong documentation of projects and the search feature is quite easy to use.

Access to the Digital Library is found through a link on the left hand side, and that is also where the search feature is located. Clicking on the search feature and typing in housing gets me to projects in Africa and Iran, places that are less well documented in this School’s collection.

The Images link within the Digital Library gets me to a list of architecture by Collection, or by Country, Building Type or Building Style. They also include Gardens and Urban Design and Development. And you can download the images.

My favorite website for the week: archnet.org

Mar 05

Images of New Deal Utopias, including Greenbelt MD, just down the road from College Park, are featured on this New York Times Blog.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/

A brief History of Greenbelt as told by guest blogger, Lucinda Philumalee.

As a historic preservation student at the University of Maryland, the nearby city of Greenbelt, Maryland is a local treasure.  Located just outside the Capital Beltway, Greenbelt is home to professors and students alike.  It serves as an example of early-to-mid 1900s cutting edge urban design.

The history of Greenbelt predates its actual establishment.  In response to the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt instituted the Emergency Relief Appropriations Act of 1935.  This provided five billion dollars in funding for public works projects, which supported the Resettlement Administration of 1935.  The Resettlement Administration was headed by Roosevelt’s advisor Rexford Guy Tugwell who developed the concept for Greenbelt, Maryland as well as its sister towns, Greendale, Wisconsin and Greenhills, Ohio.

The three planned cities were inspired by the Garden City Movement, which influenced American urban design in the early twentieth century. It was an approach to urban planning developed by Ebeneezer Howard in 1898.  Howard’s notion was to move the poor out to the countryside in order to reconnect with nature, while incorporating the use of green belts, agriculture, industry, housing, commercial and cultural places to spur the economy.

The Garden City Movement was applied to Greenbelt in several ways.  Topography was a factor in the site selection and design of Greenbelt in that the original city was formed by a crescent shaped piece of land with major roads on either side. Apartments and houses were constructed between the major roads.  Entrances to residences were comprised of one to a courtyard and one for vehicular access.  These concepts of walk-ability and courtyard living were popular because it provided a feeling of safety during a tumultuous period.

Feb 13

Professor Lindley Vann took 20 students form the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation to Sri Lanka this past January. They travelled to various sights, and we get to see the trip as documented by a friend of Lindley’s – Dwight.  Check out his Blog, for super-saturated colors of Anuradhapura, Galle, the sunsets, the markets, even the traffic!