Talk About Creative Commons

Let’s talk about Creative Commons.

For those of you looking for images to illustrate points in a paper, or populate a Powerpoint or Prezi or PDF, the internet has a wealth of images.  However, there are copyright restrictions placed on many images, and for a person doing research for scholarly publication this can be very confusing.

http://creativecommons.org/about

Creative Commons has licenses that allow copyright holders to make their work available to others, on conditions of the creator’s choice. So, if you are creating work, you can use one of several Creative Commons licenses, and if you are looking for images, music, blog posts that you can use in your own work, you want to look for items with a Creative Commons license.

 

This page explains the licenses.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/

An example of a creative commons type license you would find on an image.

 

This page allows you to search various giant databases that have Creative Commons licensed work.

http://search.creativecommons.org

Pay attention to the copyright notice attached to any image or work you find on the internet. Often people are ok with noncommercial use, as long as you attribute the creator. Remember to treat others and their intellectual property as you wish to be treated. Also, any of these licenses may be negotiated if you contact the creator of the work.

Creative Commons – Watch your license

The Creative Commons portion of the image website Flickr is a terrific place to find images, and also participate in the sharing of these images. This first page shows you the various types of licenses and attributions under which photographers allow their images to be used.

If you are looking for images to illustrate a paper or blog, go to Flickr.com and click on the word ‘search’ in the upper right hand corner of the webpage. This takes you to a new search page.  You will see a drop-down list on the left side of the search field. Click on that and, from the menu, choose The Commons, then type in a key word for flickr to search on.

This picture came from the commons portion of Flickr.

You can download the picture to your desktop, but please pay attention to the licensing and copyright tags on the picture page.

Interesting thoughts on the future of teaching and digital Scholarship

Happy New Year and welcome back to School.  Over the past few days I have been directed to some interesting websites, and I will share a couple with you here.

The first one is an NPR story that addresses a change from the lecture style of teaching, the so-called “sage on the stage” to the “guide from the side”.  It is thought that engaging the students in more active learning will help them actually retain information. 

The next article deals with digital scholarship, especially when issues of hiring, tenure and promotion come up in academia.

Digital scholarship is recognized as legitimate research, publishing and communication.  For those of you thinking about going into academia, or already in teaching and research, both articles will give you something to think about.