Code for Community Challenge

Our colleagues in Urban Studies and Planning are sponsoring a competition.
If you are an undergraduate student here at the University of Maryland, and you like competition, mobile apps, inventing things and helping your community, then this EVENT is for you. The Code for Community Challenge invites students to come up with an app that meets a community need. Click HERE for more information:
Alex Chen of Urban Studies and Planning can also be contacted for more information.

Websites of Interest – Sustainability

From time to time, I will post about websites that deal with Sustainability in its many permutations: architecture, real estate, city planning, historic preservation, and energy. The following list will start us off with connections to a broad selection of technologies, building design, and event tax credits.

Website covers topics on emerging technologies, green building, energy efficient interior design, emerging sources of renewable energy and sustainable product design

Links to public services initiatives, science and innovation, news, blogs, maps and data concerning the following topics: tax credits, heating and cooling, solar energy, home weatherization, appliances and electronics.

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Examples of energy efficient homes, buildings, cars and diagrams of solar energy, wind energy, water conservation and various fuels.

The Past Superimposed on the Present.

Take a look at What Was There: This website adds photos to places, tagged by location and year.  If there is a street view in Google maps, the photograph is  lined up from the same point of view to provide a glimpse of the same place at a different time. You can see how the streetscape has changed, as well as the architecture, car design, and fashions.

The site even allows you to fade the photograph in and out.  Cities in the United States have more photographs than other parts of the world, but I am sure that will change as more people travel the site. You can upload photographs yourself, although I have not tried that yet. This could be useful for preservationists, architects, and urban planners.