Knowing and Teaching our Undergraduate Latino/a and Black/African/Afro Caribbean Students.

As Predominantly White Institutions work to create welcoming campus climates for non-White students, they must address the complexities of race, culture, ethnicity and language that students of color bring to classrooms.

Latino/a and Black students face both academic adjustment and social integration as they begin at UMD or transfer from other institutions.  Based upon research on the history and identity construction of local Latino populations, Black immigrants and African American students, participants will take away a strong contextual and pedagogical base from this workshop.  Questions that will be discussed include: What are the cultural, academic, and historical differences between subgroups of Latinos (i.e. Salvadoran vs. Mexican vs. Puerto Rico) and how might that impact their learning experiences? How do students of color from different social class backgrounds manage inter- and intragroup relations?  What role does gender, in particular, play in the responsibilities and opportunities of Latina and Black Immigrant, and Afro Caribbean young women?  What do we know about our African American and Latino/a athletes and their often conflicting priorities and loyalties? Black and Latino students are increasingly together in urban high schools and “diversity” courses on campus.  Drawing from four years of experience teaching the I-Series “Latino and Black Schooling History” course– the author will also present effective readings, curricula, and pedagogy which generate open and honest communication in small and large groups across ethnicity, race, gender, immigrant generation, and class.

 Speaker:  Victoria-Maria MacDonald, Minority and Urban Education Department of Teaching, Learning, Policy and Leadership. 

Date: Wednesday April 30th, from 4-5:30pm

Location: 1310 Marie Mount Hall

If you have not already done so, please RSVP here

Please reply to this post to share/submit your reflection on this reading and how it relates to your own experiences by midnight on April 29th.  The reflection should be 1-2 paragraphs.  If you do not want to go to all the workshops, but still want to engage in this reflective exercise, then we invite you to participate as well.

 

 

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Stereotype threat: What you think they think can hurt you

Stereotype threat: What you think they think can hurt you

Date: Thursday, April 3rd, 4-5:30pm

Location: 1310 Marie Mount Hall

by Scott Roberts & Caitlin Murphy, Psychology Department

 In this workshop the presenters will lead a discussion of how stereotypes function in memory and how our knowledge of them can inhibit academic performance.  Luckily, the research also points us towards pedagogical practices that can reduce the harmful effect of stereotype threat, so together we’ll develop a plan to address this on our campus and in our classrooms.

Because of copyright issues, the readings for this workshop are available in pdf form when you RSVP and directly from CTE (cte@umd.edu).  To find the reading on your own the citation is:

Changing stereotypes changing grades: a longitudinal study of stereotyping during a college math course.   Ramsey, L. R. and Sekaquaptewa, D., 2011 [link]

Please reply to this post to share/submit your reflection on this reading and how it relates to your own experiences by midnight on April 2nd.  The reflection should be 1-2 paragraphs.  If you do not want to go to all the workshops, but still want to engage in this reflective exercise, then we invite you to participate as well.

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Critical Pedagogy in the Classroom Using Queer, Feminist, and Critical Race Theory

We will discuss translating foundational concepts in these theoretical traditions into the university classroom, with particular attention to pedagogy and curriculum. Queer, feminist, and critical race theories are explicitly about exposing and addressing systems of oppression, and therefore, offer a rich lens through which to think about inclusion0227ourselves as instructors and how we can better serve our students. Participants will engage with specific concepts such as intersectionality, strategic essentialism, counter story-telling, microaggressions, borderland identities, structure/agency, “benevolent” prejudice, and hierarchies of power/knowledge, among others. The focus will be on a basic understanding of some of the critical concepts and how they commonly are ignored or play out in the classroom. No background in these theories necessary for this workshop.

Speakers: Dr. Mark Brimhall-Vargas and Dr. Beth Douthirt-Cohen, Office of Diversity & Inclusion

Date: Thursday, February 27th from 4-5:30pm

Location: 1310 Marie Mount Hall

If you have not already done so, please RSVP here.

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Improving Mentoring Relationships between Faculty and Minority Graduate Students

This workshop aims to improve mentoring relationships between faculty and minority graduate students. Mentorship has been shown to Pic_Ray3be instrumental for current and future career success among graduate students. Similar to other dimensions of social life, higher education is stratified along gender and race lines with these master statuses playing important roles in the success, tenure, and promotion of women and racial/ethnic minorities within academia. My previous research has shown that minority graduate students, and minority women in particular, perceive having less respectful advisors and receiving less instrumental support than White graduate students. This workshop will address ways to reduce this racial and gender gap in the mentoring experiences of graduate students, discuss how various mentoring styles conform to the expectations of minority graduate students, and enhance faculty’s sensitivity to how their interpersonal relations with students are perceived. This dialogue will hopefully lead to more positive interpersonal communication between faculty and students.

 

The Center for Teaching Excellence in partnership with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Graduate School are offering a letter of completion to any UMD faculty, staff, or graduate students who attend four out of five workshops, and complete a short pre-workshop reading and reflection.  For this workshop, the article can be found here (Link to article). Pages 898-906 are the most relevant to this discussion. Please reply to this post to post your reflection.  If you would prefer to post your reflection under a pseudonym, please do so, but let CTE know who you are if you would like to receive a letter of completion at the end of the workshop series.

 

If you have not already RSVP’d for this workshop, you can do so here.

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